May 16th, 2011
Motion Graphics

Very nice motion graphics piece by Physalia. They are a motion-graphics and visual effects studio based in Barcelona, producing some really cool graphics. We love it and it certainly fits in line with the “Happy” theme!

Physalia have also worked with some big name brands including MTV, VW and Seat. Check out their website for more great work: http://physaliastudio.com/

Found via the website: http://uk.gizmodo.com

 

May 11th, 2011
When Big Brands get it Wrong


Everyone remembers the Pepsi Challenge, right? The taste test where blindfolded participants were asked to name their favourite cola, and Pepsi won? It was an episode that made every global brand sit up and pay attention.

In April 1985, Coke launched a new flavour. What’s so bad about that you might ask? Well, not much fundamentally. But their real mistake was scrapping the old one. And this is where brand loyalty really finds its legs. Americans were in uproar. Campaigns were launched and protestors took to the streets.

After some serious head scratching, Coke took a fresh look at the market research, and realised the error of their ways. They’d spent decades building up brand loyalty and associations. By taking away original Coke, they were taking away more than a product — consumers didn’t just like the taste, they’d bought into an ideology. 79 days later the original Coke was back in production.

Coke doesn’t have the monopoly on bad business decisions, however. Check out this article from BBC Two for more examples of when big brands get it wrong: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-13285504 inspired by the new series, ‘Business Nightmares’.

This new foray into corporate clangers might be an education on what not to do in business but equally, it sends a pretty strong message about what to do after you’ve screwed up. Perhaps most significantly, it drives home the real power of branding. As one fan put it: “My oldest daughter is 22. Her first word was Coke. Her second word was Mommy”…

 

May 10th, 2011
Leaders of Branding

News out yesterday that Apple has recently become the most valuable brand, taken over from Google’s four years at the top spot. According to the BrandZ study of the global top 100 brands, the Apple brand is now worth £93bn, and has become the world’s most valuable technology company, overtaking Microsoft last year.

A good proportion of this revenue has come from the new consumer products Apple produces, which include the iPod, iPhone and iPad. These new products (which take advantage of iOS) are for the consumer on the move and, although they didn’t invent the tablet format, they seemed to have perfected it. The iPad has become the model that other manufacturers have been trying to emulate.

The Apple brand has increasingly become one of desire. “It’s doing what luxury brands do, where the higher price the brand is, the more it seems to underpin and reinforce the desire.” says Peter Walshe, global brands director of Millward Brown.

For further reading about the top 100 brands, including how McDonalds have manipulated their brand considerably over the past years in order to shift consumer perception, visit the website http://www.telegraph.co.uk/

Found via twitter @orbstudio

Check out the Millward Brown website too.

 

May 3rd, 2011
Branding colour

Are you showing your true colours?

As brand experts, we think colour is pretty vital to how your business is viewed. Take a look at Coke, for example — that specific shade of red has been associated with the Coke brand for decades. To change it now would have far-reaching results, affecting brand recognition as well as brand loyalty. But why is it so important?

We came across this article on Idsgn about food colouring. It shows just how much colour can change how customers and clients view you and your business.

During an experiment, participants were given a well-known snack — one portion loaded with food colouring, the other without — but both with identical flavouring and ingredients. The outcome? Participants found the naked food tasted “bland” and wasn’t “much fun to eat”. According to Professor Brian Wansink from Cornell, even though the un-dyed food was identical in taste and texture, the lack of colouring meant “their fingers did not turn orange” and “their brains did not register much cheese flavour”.

So if colour can mentally affect how we taste, and our perception of how something should taste, just imagine what colour is doing for your brand. Is colour working for you or against? Are customers going to competitors simply because they prefer their brand colours over yours? The Twitter logo was green before it was blue (check it out below) – how has this change of colour affected their brand? Would you have signed up to their old website without their corporate brand blue? And what if Coke was no longer brown — would you still want to drink it?

For further reading about the colour used in food and how it can affect us, both emotionally and physically, check out the rest of the article here: http://idsgn.org/

 

February 27th, 2010
KOKOKAKA. web site and development studio.

Kokokaka, a web site production company from Sweden.

Some interesting stuff, and a great name. They have created some really nice design for some really big brands.

check out their web site: http://www.kokokaka.com/